Blog articles tagged 'functional', 'f#'

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on 7/16/2014 7:17 PM
I saw this tweet on my timeline the other day.. which reminded me again to look at Elm and I’ve spend the last week or so getting myself immersed with this wonderful little language built around the idea of functional reactive programming. My first impres[...]
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on 7/13/2014 7:57 AM
Having spent some time this week with Elm I have seen plenty of things to make me like it, a more in-depth review of my experience with Elm so far is in the works but for now I want to talk about Elm’s record type and how it compares with F# record type w[...]
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on 11/15/2013 7:22 AM
I have been a vocal advocate of F# for a long time. I’ve shared some of my little interesting discoveries in the language from time to time. I’ve been trying to help other .Net developers to see what a great, cool language F# is. I’ve tried to add intelli[...]
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on 10/22/2013 10:29 AM
So I love it when a very natural use case arises for a feature that I want to practice.  I’ve been trying to better my understanding of active patterns lately and today I found a great use for them. I’m fetching json data from a REST endpoint.  Of course [...]
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on 10/12/2013 10:01 PM
It is possible to declare a list or an array without the separating semicolons by declaring each element on a separate line.  Like this: Note: for reasons I confess are unclear to me, the first member of the list/array must be on the next line from the op[...]
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on 10/3/2013 5:00 PM
I do love the fact that F# (and functional programming in general) gives a developer the tools to make it easy to build simple code. I was hacking together a function to convert a DateTime to a Unix Time Stamp (for using with the Meetup Restful API).  Thi[...]
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on 10/1/2013 6:03 AM
A method in the Seq class can be applied to any kind of IEnumerable.  Consider the following code:
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on 8/26/2013 5:29 AM
It’s possible to use function composition and modify the type of value returned.  Consider the following equation: 1/4x2 I might encode the function to calculate this like so: let square x = x * x let recip x = 1.0/x  //If this is an int division it will [...]
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on 8/19/2013 5:57 AM
Even though tuples, records and discriminated unions are reference types, they all have the built-in equality properties you would expect in a value type.  For example: > let a = (1,’a');; val a : int * char = (1, ‘a’) > let b = (1,’a');; val b : int * ch[...]
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on 8/12/2013 10:54 AM
The F# developer can use pattern matching syntax pretty much anywhere in F#.  For example, consider the following list: let l = [1..25] If I want to get the last element of the list, I can do this with a little trivial pattern match:  let lastElem::_ = l [...]
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